t-freaking-mesis

16 notes

houghtonlib:

Lafréry, Antoine, 1512-1577. Speculum romanae magnificentiae, 1575.
Typ 525.75.509
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Lafréry, Antoine, 1512-1577. Speculum romanae magnificentiae, 1575.

Typ 525.75.509

Houghton Library, Harvard University

25 notes

yeah so everyone thinks conjugating YOLO is funny and cool
but everyone forgets the best one
feminine nominative singular future passive participle
"she who must only be lived once":
…
YOLANDA

yeah so everyone thinks conjugating YOLO is funny and cool

but everyone forgets the best one

feminine nominative singular future passive participle

"she who must only be lived once":

YOLANDA

277 notes

Anonymous said: hey. i'm majoring in sociology and now it turns out i'm pretty sure i want to keep studying classics but it's too late for me to change my major. what should i do? thank you and you're great i love your blog.

Hi! I have basically no idea how to help, but I will try! By “keep studying”, do you mean go to grad school? It won’t be a big deal that you weren’t a Classics major, as long as you’ve got a sufficient background. You could even spin your interest in sociology into a killer personal statement (especially if you’re interested more in classical history than literary studies). If you’re not sure that your background is strong enough and you don’t have enough space in your schedule to take more courses outside your major, you may have a harder time. Definitely talk to people in your college’s Classics department, because they will probably know where there is money for post-bac work or other programs that could prepare you for grad school. I think that’s the bottom line: if your college’s Classics department has a Director of Undergraduate Studies (or something similar), find them and ask for help. I hope things work out!

1 note

monumentum replied to your post “Hi, I live in Greece and I’m studying classics here and after I’ve done I’d love to do a master or sth like that abroad. Do you know any good programs (I obviously do my own research too, I’m just wondering if know anything from the top of your head/have friends who do sth similar etc)”

DPhil is just a PhD with a different name. Oxon. awards them. Also if OP is continental they may consider German universities too.

Ah, I see how I was imprecise: I was using DPhil to mean “UK PhD”, but I see that they aren’t all called that. The difference is that American PhDs require more teaching and more courses outside of your dissertation work. It’s accepted wisdom here that UK PhDs are less marketable in America for that reason. (Who knows whether it’s true, though.)

+1 on Germany, too, though I have no idea how their system works.

0 notes

Anonymous said: Hi, I live in Greece and I'm studying classics here and after I've done I'd love to do a master or sth like that abroad. Do you know any good programs (I obviously do my own research too, I'm just wondering if know anything from the top of your head/have friends who do sth similar etc)

I’m not sure! For Americans, the cursus honorum for professional classicists is a MSt at Oxbridge and a PhD at one of +/- 10 American universities (the Ivy League, Stanford, Berkeley, UChicago, University of Michigan, and a few others). Of course, take that with a grain of salt: if you scan the CVs of important people in Classics, you’ll find a huge range of paths: a smaller British university, a year in Germany, a Master’s or Post-Bac at an American university, no Master’s at all, a PhD at a less famous program, a DPhil instead of a PhD, etc. (You’ll also notice a huge range of undergraduate institutions; don’t think that not going to an elite college disqualifies you from a future in academia!)

As far as choosing a particular program, you’ll have to find a balance between the strengths of the department overall and your desire to work with a particular dissertation adviser; it depends a lot on what your research interests are and whose scholarship you most admire. I think that’s the best that I can do! Sorry if it’s a bit vague.

6 notes

Anonymous said: What is it the classics program at Harvard like?

Hello! I should probably answer this in two parts: 1) what is it like to study Classics in college? and 2) what is Harvard’s Classics department like specifically? This will be a long post.

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11 notes

(Source: musings-of-a-philhellene, via classicsmatters)

276 notes

courses, senior fall

Classics 99: Senior Thesis Tutorial
Greek 118: Homeric Hymns
AAAS 11: Introduction to African Studies
German Ax: German for Reading Knowledge

swordmaster-sarosh:

likeavirgil:

Greek vase text posts

did you mean text pots

7,632 notes